Interesting interview

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Interesting interview

Post by JoeD » Wed Oct 09, 2019 1:07 pm

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Re: Interesting interview

Post by smidge34 » Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:11 pm

The interview:

Rexrode: We’ve talked about this a little bit before, but we’ve never really hashed it out and now things have obviously changed. So where do you stand right now?

Byrd: I understand anybody who looks at the big picture and sees coaches’ salaries and football facilities and all the money that is poured into this, I understand it. I think the optics fall on the side of, the kids deserve more. But I’m on the other side of it, because I think college athletics ought to be about amateurs — of course, I still wish the Olympics were, too. Horse is out of the barn on that one. I just don’t know the way to make it work. Let’s just say Kentucky’s backup point guard can go to a car dealership and do a commercial. I would still say that’s way more about the brand than it is about the person. The Kentucky brand. Or Alabama football, a second-string cornerback wants to try to go out and do it. Same thing. And then I worry about all the external people who try to get involved with these kids to make these things happen. You’re talking about a vast minority of schools and a very, very low percentage of kids that could ever really take advantage of this opportunity.

Rexrode: To your point about the brand, I will give you an example from last year. My middle child, who was 11 then, was begging to go to Vanderbilt games because he wanted to watch Darius Garland play. And we got to one before Garland got hurt. After he got hurt, he didn’t ask to go to any more games. The schools’ brands are strong, of course, but they put an awful lot into pursuing individuals who can help them win. And then they sell jerseys with the numbers of their star athletes. School and individual brands can both have value, right?

Byrd: How many kids are we talking about in one year that create that kind of thing?

Rexrode: Not a lot.

Byrd: Let’s say you have a minor league basketball team in Lexington, Kentucky, called the Lexington Leopards, and their top eight players are better than anyone on Kentucky’s roster. They’d draw about 2,000 people and Kentucky would draw 23,000. So I think the (school) brand is a much bigger part of the equation than individual players. Zion Williamson, the Darius Garlands of the world, they go to school, they get all they get by going to school while the other 90 percent of kids out there are taking loans and working their butts off, they get a first-class education if they want it, and all the right kind of food and all the gear and all the stuff. And then the guys like Garland who can create an atmosphere where their likeness is valuable to them, they are going through Vanderbilt, or Zion Williamson is going through Duke and utilizing the magnitude of those programs — how in the world is playing that year at Duke going to impact his life in a negative way? I think all he did was impact it in a positive way, and now he’s even more valuable.

Rexrode: I think there’s a difference in those two, though. There’s no question with Zion Williamson, who was a YouTube sensation and was going to be big and a top NBA pick no matter where he went to school, there’s no question that year at Duke elevated him. I don’t think that’s nearly the same situation for a Garland at a Vanderbilt. To your point on Kentucky, if Kentucky goes out and just gets whoever to wear that jersey, and Kentucky’s not winning anymore, you won’t see 23,000 in that building anymore. You still have to get these top individual athletes who everyone pursues and spends so much money to recruit and builds facilities to recruit, right?

Byrd: Yeah but let’s say the G League was a much bigger deal and kids started doing that instead of college basketball. The University of Kentucky with worse players but still competitive at the NCAA level, will still sell out and those kids will go to the G League and the (marketing) opportunity isn’t as much because they never wore the Kentucky uniform. Name one, let’s say Julius Randle. A great high school player but will people flock to see him play minor league basketball?

Rexrode: I agree there’s a brand boost that individuals can get from playing for certain college programs. I also agree that most of the impact of this change will go to a relatively small number of elite, elite athletes. Mostly in football and men’s basketball. But I think in some towns you have women’s basketball players who are very popular. I think there have been some very marketable Lady Vols players over the years. And let’s take it to your program. Let’s take Dylan Windler — another player my son wanted to see, by the way, and we did go see him — who had a great career at Belmont. Not a guy who will make millions off it, but maybe a local business around here says “Dylan, come to a signing, you can make a few hundred bucks.” What would be wrong with that? I think that will be part of this, too. Or a volleyball player who can go to her hometown and make some money running a camp for kids in the summer. She’s using her skills and her talent to make a few bucks.

Byrd: I don’t have any problem with something like that. In fact, Drew Hanlen, who played for me and runs Pure Sweat Basketball now and trains NBA players, he was dodging compliance — well, he wasn’t dodging it, he was having to dot I’s and cross T’s his whole time at Belmont. Because he came here and he had already started as an individual teacher as a high schooler. He majored in entrepreneurship at our place and he had to make sure everything he was doing was OK when he was in school. He kept doing it, so there was a way in that case. And I’ll give you another argument for your side of it, at Belmont we have kids who come and write a song or get signed to a music label. A kid can have a huge hit, make hundreds of thousands of dollars and he’s still in school. So why can a music major do that and an athlete can’t, when we’re talking about individual freedom?

Rexrode: Yes. Capitalism. America. We’re on the same team, Rick.

Byrd: Well, that side of it makes sense. But again, we’re talking about such a small percentage. There’s a thousand schools in the NCAA. And at Belmont and places like that, the athletic department is being supported by tuition money. So those kids are helping — they don’t even know it, probably — are helping to pay for those scholarships for the athletes. And to somehow think that the vast, vast majority of college athletes aren’t getting a great deal is crazy.

Rexrode: This is where I think the discussion becomes like a political discussion. The rhetoric gets extreme and it makes you not want to listen to the important parts. Like California Gov. Gavin Newsom being with LeBron James when he signs SB206 into law and then saying all the notion of a “student-athlete” is a farce was just ridiculous. You should be offended by that because you ran a program filled with actual “student-athletes” year after year. So I get that.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by smidge34 » Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:13 pm

Thanks Coach. I agree 100%. He’s right, this will lead to Alabama football’s starting RB being a better paying gig than starting RB at Auburn or Ole Miss. That is my concern.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by runningracer » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:39 pm

If athletes want to go pro---no one is stopping them. If they are talented enough. There are options overseas, soon will be opportunities in the G league. Colleges should remain a place for amateurs. I would not mind limited spending money, but not an open market for the highest bidder, which could ultimately lead to corruption of the college game.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by racerlover » Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:04 pm

If you want to eliminate most of this crap, the four big United States professional leagues should ALL make their draft eligibility age set at 18. You can join the military at 18, so it shouldn't be an issue to get into the NFL or NBA at the same age. That would keep the college game more traditional. It would eliminate the nightmare of trying to regulate paying student athletes, which would really be impossible to control.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by JoeD » Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:39 pm

The leagues know that in general, signing 18 year olds is a bad idea. Baseball gets away from it by having a huge draft, low minor league pay and signing bonus structure, and a huge minor league system.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by racerlover » Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:52 pm

JoeD wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:39 pm
The leagues know that in general, signing 18 year olds is a bad idea. Baseball gets away from it by having a huge draft, low minor league pay and signing bonus structure, and a huge minor league system.
But why? If the player is good enough, fast enough, strong enough, what would it matter?
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by smidge34 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:09 pm

I agree open it up to 18 year olds but I also believe in an owner’s right to run their business how they see fit within the law. I’d also like to see Nike put their billions where their big mouth is along with other shoe companies and start some kind of semi pro training league similar to but an extended version of the the g-league. Let kids with no interest in being amateur college athletes have a place to go as a professional training ground for the NBA, Euro and others and get that out of college sports.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by JoeD » Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:20 pm

racerlover wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:52 pm
JoeD wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:39 pm
The leagues know that in general, signing 18 year olds is a bad idea. Baseball gets away from it by having a huge draft, low minor league pay and signing bonus structure, and a huge minor league system.
But why? If the player is good enough, fast enough, strong enough, what would it matter?
Because you don’t know any of that with an 18 year old kid. And you can’t know it. And at that point, teams have already spend tens of millions.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by racerlover » Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:58 pm

JoeD wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:20 pm
racerlover wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:52 pm
JoeD wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:39 pm
The leagues know that in general, signing 18 year olds is a bad idea. Baseball gets away from it by having a huge draft, low minor league pay and signing bonus structure, and a huge minor league system.
But why? If the player is good enough, fast enough, strong enough, what would it matter?
Because you don’t know any of that with an 18 year old kid. And you can’t know it. And at that point, teams have already spend tens of millions.
I remember LeBron being 18 during his first game. So was Kobe. Ja is 20 years old when he makes his NBA debut. You're honestly telling me there's a heap of difference in those two years? The fact is that the NCAA makes most of their coin from March Madness. And you can bet the NBA gets a kickback of it. It's all about money. That's it. Hell, a 14 year old can be a professional in tennis, so don't tell me an 18 year old can't make it in the NBA and that scouts wouldn't be able to tell. It's been done numerous times.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by speck » Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:10 pm

You only get one chance at a chance of a lifetime.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by JoeD » Thu Oct 10, 2019 10:46 pm

racerlover wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:58 pm
JoeD wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:20 pm
racerlover wrote:
Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:52 pm


But why? If the player is good enough, fast enough, strong enough, what would it matter?
Because you don’t know any of that with an 18 year old kid. And you can’t know it. And at that point, teams have already spend tens of millions.
I remember LeBron being 18 during his first game. So was Kobe. Ja is 20 years old when he makes his NBA debut. You're honestly telling me there's a heap of difference in those two years? The fact is that the NCAA makes most of their coin from March Madness. And you can bet the NBA gets a kickback of it. It's all about money. That's it. Hell, a 14 year old can be a professional in tennis, so don't tell me an 18 year old can't make it in the NBA and that scouts wouldn't be able to tell. It's been done numerous times.

Stromile Swift, Kwame Brown, Sebastian Telfair, Jonathan Bender, DaSagana Diop, Robert Swift, Leon Smith, Darius Miles, Martell Webster...

Yes there is a large difference between those two years. Ask Ja Morant.
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by runningracer » Fri Oct 11, 2019 10:47 am

The NBA is a business. If they put a lot of money on a kid that is not good enough, that is their problem. There are plenty of opportunities for players to earn money. If that is what they want, let them go straight to the pros. The chance of injury, or lack of success at the pro level is a good reason to play as an amateur instead. They are not tied to the colleges, and have the freedom to leave at any point and turn pro. Meanwhile, they develop not only their game, but their life. In case of injury, age, or lack of ability, they at least have a start on an education. That will be quite an asset when they start their life after basketball. :twocents:
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Re: Interesting interview

Post by JoeD » Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:27 pm

I get it, but remember, the one and done rule is one the NBA chose to implement as “good for their business”
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